Why’ Reporting Alone Isn’t a Strong Enough Business Intelligence Strategy

Not having a single version of the truth for business intelligence data used for reporting—such as data about customers, products, channel partners, suppliers, and employees—slows analysis, delays action, and impedes your ability to improve business performance. Continue reading “Why’ Reporting Alone Isn’t a Strong Enough Business Intelligence Strategy” »

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Big Data: Challenge or Opportunity?

Consider a simple example of going for a movie with your family: you send a tweet that you are going for a movie and create data; you browse through the list of movies and theaters and access data; you purchase tickets online and create data; you fill fuel on your way and swipe your card to pay, and create data; you post a review on the movie on Facebook and create data.

Just as you create and work with data throughout this activity, your credit card company, the movie theatre and fuel station also juggle with terra bytes of business and customer data on a daily basis. While this data can pose several challenges for businesses, it creates opportunities for organizations to gain insight into their customer’s buying preferences and choices.

According to a recent research report published by Gartner, Big data forces businesses to wrestle with three key strategic and operational challenges: Information Strategy, Data Analytics and Enterprise Information Management.

Here is a more detailed explanation from Gartner on each of these operational challenges. These illustrations can benefit our customers when they formulate big data strategies for their organizations. I would highly recommend all of us to read these explanations and use these references while answering big data related questions we face from our customers.

Information Strategy

Enterprises need to harness the power of information assets. Big data is causing enterprises to find new ways to leverage information sources to drive growth. When trying to identify ways in which their enterprise can benefit from big data and why it’s important, they need to make the strategic decisions that will transform their business.

Strategy: Is their organization prepared for an information-led transformation? How will they harness big data to improve strategic decision making? They need to know which investments will deliver the most business value and ROI.

Governance: How will they govern their organization’s information assets in support of their enterprise information management (EIM) goal? Are there new expectations for information quality and management?

Talent: By 2015, Gartner predicts that 4.4 million jobs will be created around big data. Does their organization lack the “data scientist” talent required to exploit big data? How will they assemble the right teams and align skills?

Data Analytics

Businesses need to draw more insight from big data analytics or large and complex datasets. They need to predict future customer behaviors, trends and outcomes. IT is under pressure to tap into growing quantities of data to help the business make better, informed decisions by combining new sources of big data with existing enterprise dark data. How will they uncover more customer and business insight and more data value?

Predictive Analytics: How are they using data for predictive and real-time analysis across various business domains? How can they use unstructured enterprise information and data to drive a better client experience? How are they leveraging new data types: sentiment data, clickstream data, video, images and text data?

Behavioral Analytics: How will they tap into complex data sets to create new models to drive business outcomes, decrease costs, drive innovation or improve customer satisfaction?

Data Interpretation: What new business analysis can be drawn from their data? How will IT help support insight discovery and new information trends? They need to know which data to integrate for new product innovation.

Enterprise Information Management

Information is everywhere – volume, variety, velocity – and it keeps growing. Organizations need to manage access to growing extreme information management requirements and drive innovation in rapid information processing. What are they doing with all of the data the organization collects? They have many disparate sources – from their enterprise’s “dark data” and partner, employee, customer and supplier data to public, commercial and social media data – that they need to link and exploit to its fullest value:

User expectations: Employees are demanding more access to big data sources. What’s their plan to manage access to these information sources? What are the use cases?

Costs: How can they deliver access to big data in a rapid and cost-effective way to support better decision-making?

Tools: How will they link these new sources of diverse data? They need to plan the impact on the data center. Have they identified the processes, tools and technologies they need to support big data in their enterprise?

Mckinsey calls big data “the next frontier of innovation”. Evidently, the challenges with big data are limited when compared to the opportunities it creates and the potential benefits it offers. Our creativity, knowledge and ability to contextualize and understand this data is key to deriving value from it.

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Is Social Mining already deciding your forecasting and Pricing?



big data analytic services

A recent study conducted by Oracle Corporation in the retail sector revealed that customers are more social media savvy and the reason behind selecting a particular brand as the best brand is customer service (post sale). If you have visited Japan, Australia or India you may have seen an “Oxygen Bar.” These are establishments that sell oxygen for recreational and consumer usage…seriously. Visit www.o2bar.com.au or Google it. When I first saw the statistics below, I felt that maybe what I really need is a “free air” bar, as in free of Social Media. But this seems impossible in today’s digital world. Social Media has not only played a major role in connecting people, it has also brought a paradigm shift in the way enterprises conduct business.

Here are some quick facts about the ever-present role social media now plays in our relationships and buying decisions:

- How demand is influenced (Forecast)

- 20% of time on PCs is spent on social media. On mobile devices, people are on social media 30% of the time (Nielson)

- Consumers are 71% more likely to make a purchase based on social media referrals (Hubspot)

- Social networks influence nearly 50% of all IT decision makers (LinkedIn – learn more at TechConnect ’12)

- 74% of consumers rely on social networks to guide purchase decisions (SproutSocial)

- Facebook is the most effective platform to get consumers talking about products (SproutSocial)

- 44% of automotive consumers conduct research on forums (Mashable)

- 81% of US respondents indicated that friends’ social media posts directly influenced their purchase decision (Forbes)

- 78% of respondents said that companies’ social media posts impact their purchases (Forbes)

It is not enough for a company to say, “I am mining social data and using Big Data technologies.” Instead companies need to clearly state and understand “What are you mining?”;”Do you understand the ROI?”; ”Do you know how it integrates with demand and pricing management?” If the answers to these questions are not clear, you may not be there yet; but should any sense of complacency arise, just ask, “Is my competitor ahead of me with social mining?”

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How Tableau Helps CIOs See DATA Differently

With Tableau’s IPO this past Friday (trading under the ticker symbol “DATA”) and IDC’s title as “the world’s fastest growing Business Intelligence Company” back in 2012, Tableau is making big strides as a top data visualization tool. With more than 100,000 users, Tableau is being used in revolutionary ways to solve diverse problems from maximizing customer loyalty for a clothing brand to minimizing patient wait time in hospitals.

BI Analytics tool

Tableau is a BI analytics solution that lets you probe, question, interact and understand data through visualization. Tableau allows you to instantly filter, zoom, compare, sort and group your data to tell a story. From GI mapping to heat maps, Tableau offers many visual formats to help discover data-driven answers to business questions.

What distinguishes Tableau from other tools is how seemingly user friendly it is. Data analytics is now becoming accessible to the masses with Tableau’s easy drag-and-drop interface.  Analysts who were previously limited to interpreting reports are now empowered to build their own unique views of the data. IT developers who used to create these reports now have more time to work on proactive technology initiatives. You can share Tableau reports to a viewer, group of viewers or even the public. Tableau is additionally accessible in any web browser or on tablets.

CIO’s are looking to Tableau as a top Business Intelligence analytics tool for their businesses, recognizing even its structural power to increase efficiency amongst analysts and enable IT to delve into other projects. The accessibility and usability further brings Tableau to the forefront of CIO’s interests.

Hilary Perry is a business analyst with Bodhtree who focusses on emerging Big Data technologies.  Bodhtree empowers enterprises to navigate Big Data challenges and opportunities with its GPS solution portfolio: Growth, Productivity and Security.  To explore what your business can achieve with Big Data, contact Bodhtree at business@bodhtree.com.

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